Remote radiology consultant sets up cost-effective practice using Macs

Posted on November 24, 2009 by

This is a very interesting article, especially for anyone in the medical field.  It talks about creating a remote radiology practice using Macs and how it can be cost-saving for hospitals.  Read the entire article here.

Bakker's Remote Radiology Mac Setup

Bakker's Remote Radiology Mac Setup

From the article:
In a small hospital in northern Minnesota, a radiology technologist completes a CT scan series of a middle-aged man who has sustained a life-threatening head injury in a fall. She immediately transmits the images over a secure network to Rural Radiology Consultants, 60 miles away in Bemidji.

She also sends a text message to Dr. Hilton Bakker, which he receives on his iPhone. He goes to his workstation, where the patient’s file, with the designation STAT (immediate), appears at the top of a list on the monitor of his Mac Pro. He clicks on it, reads the images in OsiriX Pro, a DICOM viewer, and dictates his report: an epidural hematoma. He proofreads his comments and clicks to send the file to his picture archiving and communication system (PACS) and to the hospital. He taps a number on his iPhone to confer with the attending doctor, who is watching his report come off a printer. Turnaround time: 10 minutes.

Rural Radiology Consultants Paying Less for More
In a small hospital in northern Minnesota, a radiology technologist completes a CT scan series of a middle-aged man who has sustained a life-threatening head injury in a fall. She immediately transmits the images over a secure network to Rural Radiology Consultants, 60 miles away in Bemidji.
She also sends a text message to Dr. Hilton Bakker, which he receives on his iPhone. He goes to his workstation, where the patient’s file, with the designation STAT (immediate), appears at the top of a list on the monitor of his Mac Pro. He clicks on it, reads the images in OsiriX Pro, a DICOM viewer, and dictates his report: an epidural hematoma. He proofreads his comments and clicks to send the file to his picture archiving and communication system (PACS) and to the hospital. He taps a number on his iPhone to confer with the attending doctor, who is watching his report come off a printer. Turnaround time: 10 minutes.

At Rural Radiology Consultants, Dr. Bakker was asked by the local hospitals he serves to install a PACS system. Dr. Bakker had previously worked with three vendors of Windows-based PACS systems, and wanted something more reliable so IT support would not be a concern. He also wanted a fully automated, integrated system that would simplify workflow in his practice and enable him to serve the hospitals efficiently.

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